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By contactus@orchardpediatrics.com
January 16, 2020
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Save your dollars!!  For colds, coughs, and sore throats, Great Grandma's remedies are still the safest and most effective.  We know how tempting it is to use over-the-counter medications that promise instant relief for colds and coughs.  But these medications have limited, temporary effectiveness at best, and all have potential side effects - some serious - especially in kids.  There are plenty of safer alternatives that actually offer comfort and can help everyone get more sleep!

What to use instead:  Acetaminophen (Tylenol), ibuprofen (Motrin or Advil), Nasal Saline, chicken soup, clear fluids, popsicles, honey (over 12 months of age), steam, hard candies (if past choking age), suckers.

Read what the American Academy of Pediatrics has to say:

Coughs and Colds: Medicines or Home Remedies?

Read more from the Mayo Clinic:

Cold remedies: What works, what doesn't, what can't hurt

 

 

By contactus@orchardpediatrics.com
November 27, 2019
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It's dark outside. The weather looks ominous.  Everyone has a cold.  We're too busy.  We're stressed.  How can we say "Happy Thanksgiving" and mean it?  Here are two great ways:

1.  We're serious about silliness!!  Check out this great article from Motherly

2.  Gratitude is good for your health!!  Here are some tips on how to teach it!

By contactus@orchardpediatrics.com
November 10, 2019
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Yikes!  Just saw the weather forecast for this week.  Yes, it feels way too early to pull out the winter gear!  But it's always less stressful and more fun when we're prepared for it.  Now let's enjoy some fresh air and exercise!

Here are the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations for winter clothing and outside activity safety. 

Click here for the chart below.  You can use it to decide if your baby or older child will be comfortable and safe outside when it's cold.

 

 

By contactus@orchardpediatrics.com
August 26, 2019
Category: Uncategorized
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It's that time of year again with all of it's mixed emotions.  We hope everyone has a smooth transition back to the school-year routine and a school year filled with learning and growing.  

Remember to get enough sleep and find some downtime as the year gets rolling!

Here are some links about back-to-school concerns you may want to check out or share!!

Back to School Tips: Making the First Day Easier

School Avoidance:  Tips for concerned parents

Back to School:  Battling the Butterflies

Help Your Child Get Organized

stopbullying.gov What Kids Can Do

P.S.:  We'll send a Mail Chimp to let you know when Influenza Vaccines are available!

 

By contactus@orchardpediatrics.com
July 29, 2019
Category: Uncategorized
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What to Do When Your Child Won’t Drink Milk?

5 truths to help you bone up on calcium

A great read from the CLEVELAND CLINIC!  click here

We know that deciding what's best for your family can be confusing. To help you sort it all out, here are parents' frequently asked questions from The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) about cow's milk alternatives.  Read more...

Milk provides protein, fat, calcium and Vitamin D.  So what are the alternatives if your child doesn't like it or can't have dairy?  

This chart shows how milk alternatives differ in the amount of protein, fat, calories and iron they provide.  You can also use the calcium RDAs chart and "Sources of Calcium"  foods list below to make sure your child is getting enough.  

 Sources of Calcium

  • Yogurt, plain, low-fat (8 oz.) — 415 mg
  • Mozzarella cheese (1.5 oz.) — 333 mg
  • Yogurt, fruit, low-fat (8 oz.) — 313–384 mg
  • Cheddar cheese (1.5 oz.) — 307 mg
  • Milk, nonfat (8 oz.) — 299 mg
  • Soy milk, calcium-fortified (8 oz.) — 299 mg
  • Milk, 2% (8 oz.) — 293 mg
  • Milk, whole (8 oz.) — 276 mg
  • Orange juice, calcium-fortified (6 oz.) — 261 mg
  • Salmon (3 oz.) — 181 mg
  • Cereal, calcium-fortified (1 cup) — 100–1,000 mg
  • Turnip greens (½ cup) — 99 mg
  • Kale (1 cup) — 94–100 mg
  • Ice cream, vanilla (½ cup) — 84 mg
  • Bread, white (1 slice) — 73 mg
  • Broccoli (½ cup) — 21 mg