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Posts for category: Child Care

By Orchard Pediatrics, PC
June 25, 2019
Category: Child Care
Tags: Newborn  

NewbornFrom sleeping and feeding schedules to check-ups and immunizations, newborn babies have very specific health care needs, especially in their first couple of weeks of life. Fortunately, the pediatricians here at Orchard Pediatrics, PC, in West Bloomfield, MI, can help you navigate all of your newborn baby's needs from day one.

More about Newborn Child Care

Caring for your newborn can feel stressful and overwhelming, especially for first-time parents. However, there are a number of resources available to help you navigate the journey. Here are some of the most common health issues and conditions that typically affect newborn babies:

  • Colic
  • Diaper rash
  • Skin conditions
  • Fever
  • Diarrhea
  • Constipation
  • Vomiting
  • Jaundice
  • Ear infections

Every newborn is different and will have different health and childcare needs. However, newborn child care is also about more than taking your baby to the pediatrician when they get sick. Wellcare visits and checkups are essential for monitoring your baby's growth and development, especially in the first few years.

In general, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that parents take newborns for a check-up within the first 3 to 5 days, followed by monthly visits for the first two months, then every two months from 4 to 6 months, followed by every three months until 18 months, and then again at 24 months.

The pediatrician will weigh the baby at every appointment as well as take measurements, check their hearing, and perform a physical exam and perform any necessary screenings and blood test. Your child's development and any behavioral issues or concerns are also addressed. Immunizations are administered according to the schedule and guidelines recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Find a Pediatrician in West Bloomfield, MI

For more inform about newborn child care and other pediatric services, contact Orchard Pediatrics, PC in West Bloomfield, MI, by calling (248) 855-7510 to schedule an appointment with one of our pediatricians today!

By Orchard Pediatrics, PC
May 30, 2019
Category: Child Care

Child AsthmaA common condition seen in kids and teens, asthma is a lung condition that causes trouble breathing and shortness of breath. During an attack, the bronchial airways become inflamed and the muscles surrounding them constrict, making breathing difficult. Repeated attacks may cause permanent lung damage and in severe cases can be life-threatening. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, more than 23 million Americans have the condition and more than one-quarter of them are children under the age of 18.

Asthma Causes

There are a variety of triggers that can lead to an asthma flare-up or make asthma worse. These vary for every person, but common triggers include:

  • Allergens, such as animal dander, pollens, mold, and house dust mites
  • Environmental irritants, such as cigarettes, dry air, fragrances, and air pollution
  • Infections, such as pneumonia, sinus infection and viral infections of the nose and throat
  • Exercise
  • Stress

Does My Child Have Asthma?

According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, asthma is the most common chronic medical problem in children. Asthma symptoms will vary in frequency and severity, and most children with asthma develop their first symptoms before the age of five.  Common signs include:

  • Coughing
  • Wheezing
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Tightness in chest

If you think your child may have asthma, contact your pediatrician. They can help you identify the early signs of childhood asthma and provide support for prevention and treatment.

A child may be at a greater risk for having asthma if there is a family history of asthma or if the child has eczema or frequent bouts of chronic lower respiratory problems occurring before the first birthday.  Keeping your kids away from cigarette smoke in the home or car, removing pets from the house, paying attention to pollen and air quality forecasts and monitoring exercise are all ways to reduce asthma problems.  

The good news is that the majority of asthma cases are only mild, and when the condition is properly managed with medications and extra caution, severe asthma flare-ups can be prevented.  Work with your child’s pediatrician to learn more about the condition and ensure your child leads a healthy, normal, active life.

By contactus@orchardpediatrics.com
April 17, 2019
Category: Child Care
Tags: Asthma  

An asthma attack can be a terrifying experience for both the child experiencing it as well as the parents watching it happen. If you suspect Asthmathat your child has asthma, please contact Orchard Pediatrics in West Bloomfield, MI. Our five pediatricians will help you and your child manage symptoms so that you can all breathe a bit easier!

 

What is asthma?

It is a chronic pulmonary condition affecting more than nine percent of American children, according to reports from the Center for Disease Control (CDC). However, it impacts almost as many adults, including seniors. Whatever the age, the coughing, wheezing, fatigue, and shortness of breath that characterize asthma all require rapid relief and long-term control.

Asthma involves inflammation of the bronchial tree, which takes air through the trachea down into the lungs. Oxygen passes into the bloodstream through highly vascularized air sacs called alveoli, but when this passageway is inflamed, this air exchange is impaired, which can impede everyday function and even life itself!

 

What are common asthma triggers?

Night time coughing and wheezing typically characterize childhood asthma. These symptoms may be caused or triggered by a variety of environmental factors or health conditions such as:

  • A cold, flu, or pneumonia
  • Cold outdoor air temperature
  • Tobacco or wood smoke
  • Car exhaust
  • Paint fumes
  • Allergens such as dust, mold, pollen, or animal dander
  • Exercise
  • Stress, excitement, and laughter (according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America)

 

How is asthma diagnosed?

Your pediatrician at Orchard Pediatrics in West Bloomfield will do a complete physical examination of your child, noting any symptoms and listening to breathing patterns. The doctor will then note possible triggers and may order allergy testing and lab work.

 

How is childhood asthma treated?

As needed, the pediatrician prescribes fast-acting bronchodilators for sudden attacks. These are often called rescue medications. Also, long-term medications, such as inhaled corticosteroids, are a common choice.

Additionally, you and the doctor will formulate an asthma care plan suited to your child's condition, age, and activity level. Keeping a diary of symptoms is often encouraged, as is measuring peak flow, or the amount of air the patient can expel in one breath. Declining peak flow readings indicates reduced lung function and the possible onset of an asthma episode.

 

More questions?

Call Orchard Pediatrics in West Bloomfield at (248) 855-7510 with any questions or concerns that you have about your child's asthma!

By contactus@orchardpediatrics.com
March 14, 2019
Category: Child Care
Tags: ADHD  

Know the warning signs and symptoms that might indicate that your child has ADHD.

Does your child have trouble sitting still, often space out, or have trouble staying on task? If so, then your little one may be dealing with ADHDattention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Read on to learn more about the topic, and call one of our offices in West Bloomfield, Commerce Township, or Farmington Hills, MI if you are concerned that your child might need treatment.

 

What is ADHD and what are its symptoms?

This neurodevelopmental disorder often greatly impacts a child’s personal and academic life. Of course, symptoms vary from child to child so it isn’t always easy to tell if your child is displaying symptoms of ADHD or not. Here are the classic signs that your child may be dealing with ADHD:

  • Interrupting: Children with ADHD have trouble waiting their turn, interrupt others while talking, and have trouble playing games. They may also be more likely to blurt out the answers in class rather than waiting for the teacher to call on them.
  • Emotional issues: Children with ADHD may also have difficulty regulating their emotions. They may be prone to outbursts, tantrums, and anger, usually during unusual or inappropriate moments. This is particularly true of younger children.
  • Fidgeting: Does your child have trouble sitting still? Do they squirm at their desks or have to get up and move around all the time? This symptom can also make it challenging for children to play with others or play calmly.
  • Loss of interest: Does your child move on to other tasks before completing the first one? Do they seem to jump from one thing to another without finishing anything? While children with ADHD may show a great deal of interest in many different things they have trouble focusing on just one thing such as homework or chores.
  • Difficulty paying attention: A child with ADHD has a lot of trouble paying attention and staying focused, even if someone is talking directly to them. If your child seems like they aren’t listening to you or doesn’t remember what you just told them, then they could have ADHD.
  • Mistakes: Children with ADHD have a lot of trouble concentrating, which also means that they have trouble following directions. This can lead to careless mistakes that may be misconstrued as not caring or laziness.

While children will display many of these behaviors at some point, it’s a good idea to schedule an evaluation at one of our offices in West Bloomfield, Commerce Township, or Farmington Hills if your child is regularly displaying these signs of ADHD and it’s interfering with academic performance, home life, or relationships.

 

If you suspect that your child might be dealing with ADHD, it’s time to call Orchard Pediatrics today at (248) 855-7510 to schedule a consultation. We are proud to offer comprehensive pediatric medical care in West Bloomfield, Commerce Township, and Farmington Hills, MI.

By Orchard Pediatrics, PC
December 10, 2018
Category: Child Care
Tags: Asthma  

Asthma, the leading cause of chronic illness in children, affects more than 8 percent of kids in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The lung disease keeps kids out of school and prevents them from enjoying sports and activities. However, thanks to effective asthma treatment plans offered by your West Bloomfield, MI, pediatricians at Orchard Pediatrics, children with asthma can breathe easier!

Child AsthmaWhat is asthma?

Asthma occurs when the small airways in your child's lungs become inflamed and fill with mucus. As a result, the airways narrow, restricting the amount of air that reaches the lungs. It's not always easy to determine why your child has asthma, but several factors may play a role, including allergies, a family history of the disease, exposure to cigarette smoke, frequent respiratory infections, a case of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) as a baby, or low birth weight.

What are the common symptoms of asthma?

If your child has asthma, they may complain about chest tightness or pain. Kids with asthma often also carry a frequent cough, even when they don't seem to be sick. This coughing can affect sleep, leading to daytime fatigue. Wheezing, shortness of breath, and chest congestion may also occur. If your child has asthma and develops a respiratory infection, it may take longer for them to get better. Asthma may also affect your child's ability to play or participate in sports, as symptoms may worsen with activity. If your child has exercise-induced asthma, symptoms may only occur when your son or daughter runs or plays sports.

How is asthma treated?

Oral and inhaled medications are commonly used to treat asthma in children. The medications reduce inflammation, open the airways and relax the muscles that surround the airways. If your child has exercise-induced asthma, they may only need to use asthma medications before and during sports and other activities. Treating conditions that contribute to asthma, such as allergies or gastroesophageal reflux disorder (GERD), can be helpful in reducing symptoms and flare-ups.

If your child has extreme difficulty breathing or can't finish a sentence without pausing to take a breath, don't wait to see the pediatrician. Take your son or daughter to the emergency room immediately.

Concerned? Give us a call

Are you worried that your child may have asthma? Call the West Bloomfield, MI, pediatricians at Orchard Pediatrics at (248) 855-7510 to schedule an appointment.