My Blog
By Orchard Pediatrics, PC
August 29, 2019
Tags: Asthma  

How your pediatricians in West Bloomfield, MI, can help with childhood asthma

Childhood asthma can be scary for your child, and for you. Your pediatrician can help you and your child cope with asthma, so your child Asthmacan live an active, happy life without the fear of an asthma attack. The pediatricians at Orchard Pediatrics in West Bloomfield, MI, offer a full range of pediatric care services, including asthma treatment.

According to the Mayo Clinic, some of the most common symptoms of asthma include:

  • Coughing and wheezing
  • Problems breathing, especially during physical activity
  • Tightness and discomfort in the chest
  • Chronic, recurring bronchitis

For infants and very young children, you may notice these signs and symptoms:

  • Slow feeding or eating and shortness of breath while eating
  • Avoiding moving around or playing because of breathing problems
  • Quickly tiring out, or coughing while being active
  • Lingering illnesses like a cold or coughing
  • Symptoms becoming worse at night

Asthma can be uncomfortable and annoying, and it can also potentially be life-threatening. An acute attack needs to be treated as an emergency and requires immediate treatment. An acute asthma episode can cause:

  • Gasping and difficulty breathing
  • Trouble speaking because of lack of breath
  • Deep breathing which causes the abdomen to get sucked under the ribs

Your pediatrician can help childhood asthma with several effective treatments. Treatment begins with asthma testing to determine your child’s level of lung function. Common tests include spirometry and peak flow measurement to measure how well your child’s lungs function. Allergy testing may also be a part of initial treatment, because asthma is often triggered by allergies.

Underlying allergies may be treated by allergy shots or sublingual immunotherapy. Asthma is treated with a combination of medications including short-term rescue inhalers for acute symptoms, and long-term medications to help with breathing and lung function.

If your child has asthma, avoid cigarette smoke and environmental triggers, especially substances your child is allergic to. To find out more about childhood asthma symptoms and treatment, call the pediatricians at Orchard Pediatrics in West Bloomfield, MI, today!

By contactus@orchardpediatrics.com
August 26, 2019
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

 

 

 

It's that time of year again with all of it's mixed emotions.  We hope everyone has a smooth transition back to the school-year routine and a school year filled with learning and growing.  

Remember to get enough sleep and find some downtime as the year gets rolling!

Here are some links about back-to-school concerns you may want to check out or share!!

Back to School Tips: Making the First Day Easier

School Avoidance:  Tips for concerned parents

Back to School:  Battling the Butterflies

Help Your Child Get Organized

stopbullying.gov What Kids Can Do

P.S.:  We'll send a Mail Chimp to let you know when Influenza Vaccines are available!

 

By contactus@orchardpediatrics.com
July 29, 2019
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

 

What to Do When Your Child Won’t Drink Milk?

5 truths to help you bone up on calcium

A great read from the CLEVELAND CLINIC!  click here

We know that deciding what's best for your family can be confusing. To help you sort it all out, here are parents' frequently asked questions from The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) about cow's milk alternatives.  Read more...

Milk provides protein, fat, calcium and Vitamin D.  So what are the alternatives if your child doesn't like it or can't have dairy?  

This chart shows how milk alternatives differ in the amount of protein, fat, calories and iron they provide.  You can also use the calcium RDAs chart and "Sources of Calcium"  foods list below to make sure your child is getting enough.  

 Sources of Calcium

  • Yogurt, plain, low-fat (8 oz.) — 415 mg
  • Mozzarella cheese (1.5 oz.) — 333 mg
  • Yogurt, fruit, low-fat (8 oz.) — 313–384 mg
  • Cheddar cheese (1.5 oz.) — 307 mg
  • Milk, nonfat (8 oz.) — 299 mg
  • Soy milk, calcium-fortified (8 oz.) — 299 mg
  • Milk, 2% (8 oz.) — 293 mg
  • Milk, whole (8 oz.) — 276 mg
  • Orange juice, calcium-fortified (6 oz.) — 261 mg
  • Salmon (3 oz.) — 181 mg
  • Cereal, calcium-fortified (1 cup) — 100–1,000 mg
  • Turnip greens (½ cup) — 99 mg
  • Kale (1 cup) — 94–100 mg
  • Ice cream, vanilla (½ cup) — 84 mg
  • Bread, white (1 slice) — 73 mg
  • Broccoli (½ cup) — 21 mg

 

By Orchard Pediatrics, PC
June 25, 2019
Category: Child Care
Tags: Newborn  

NewbornFrom sleeping and feeding schedules to check-ups and immunizations, newborn babies have very specific health care needs, especially in their first couple of weeks of life. Fortunately, the pediatricians here at Orchard Pediatrics, PC, in West Bloomfield, MI, can help you navigate all of your newborn baby's needs from day one.

More about Newborn Child Care

Caring for your newborn can feel stressful and overwhelming, especially for first-time parents. However, there are a number of resources available to help you navigate the journey. Here are some of the most common health issues and conditions that typically affect newborn babies:

  • Colic
  • Diaper rash
  • Skin conditions
  • Fever
  • Diarrhea
  • Constipation
  • Vomiting
  • Jaundice
  • Ear infections

Every newborn is different and will have different health and childcare needs. However, newborn child care is also about more than taking your baby to the pediatrician when they get sick. Wellcare visits and checkups are essential for monitoring your baby's growth and development, especially in the first few years.

In general, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that parents take newborns for a check-up within the first 3 to 5 days, followed by monthly visits for the first two months, then every two months from 4 to 6 months, followed by every three months until 18 months, and then again at 24 months.

The pediatrician will weigh the baby at every appointment as well as take measurements, check their hearing, and perform a physical exam and perform any necessary screenings and blood test. Your child's development and any behavioral issues or concerns are also addressed. Immunizations are administered according to the schedule and guidelines recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Find a Pediatrician in West Bloomfield, MI

For more inform about newborn child care and other pediatric services, contact Orchard Pediatrics, PC in West Bloomfield, MI, by calling (248) 855-7510 to schedule an appointment with one of our pediatricians today!

By Orchard Pediatrics, PC
May 30, 2019
Category: Child Care

Child AsthmaA common condition seen in kids and teens, asthma is a lung condition that causes trouble breathing and shortness of breath. During an attack, the bronchial airways become inflamed and the muscles surrounding them constrict, making breathing difficult. Repeated attacks may cause permanent lung damage and in severe cases can be life-threatening. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, more than 23 million Americans have the condition and more than one-quarter of them are children under the age of 18.

Asthma Causes

There are a variety of triggers that can lead to an asthma flare-up or make asthma worse. These vary for every person, but common triggers include:

  • Allergens, such as animal dander, pollens, mold, and house dust mites
  • Environmental irritants, such as cigarettes, dry air, fragrances, and air pollution
  • Infections, such as pneumonia, sinus infection and viral infections of the nose and throat
  • Exercise
  • Stress

Does My Child Have Asthma?

According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, asthma is the most common chronic medical problem in children. Asthma symptoms will vary in frequency and severity, and most children with asthma develop their first symptoms before the age of five.  Common signs include:

  • Coughing
  • Wheezing
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Tightness in chest

If you think your child may have asthma, contact your pediatrician. They can help you identify the early signs of childhood asthma and provide support for prevention and treatment.

A child may be at a greater risk for having asthma if there is a family history of asthma or if the child has eczema or frequent bouts of chronic lower respiratory problems occurring before the first birthday.  Keeping your kids away from cigarette smoke in the home or car, removing pets from the house, paying attention to pollen and air quality forecasts and monitoring exercise are all ways to reduce asthma problems.  

The good news is that the majority of asthma cases are only mild, and when the condition is properly managed with medications and extra caution, severe asthma flare-ups can be prevented.  Work with your child’s pediatrician to learn more about the condition and ensure your child leads a healthy, normal, active life.





This website includes materials that are protected by copyright, or other proprietary rights. Transmission or reproduction of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use, as defined in the copyright laws, requires the written permission of the copyright owners.